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Fetal alcoholism syndrome, detected in the newborn's chair

Fetal alcoholism syndrome, detected in the newborn's chair



Children who have been diagnosed with Fetal Syndrome (SFB) are more prone to psychiatric and behavioral problems later in life, including a high risk of school dropout, unemployment or delinquent behavior, Science Daily reports.
Studies have shown that early intervention is the key element in minimizing the negative effects of SFB. Unfortunately, early diagnosis of SFB is not always possible, especially if certain physical features are not present. Now there is a new way to diagnose those children affected by SFB.
Dr. Jennifer Peterson, who is currently working at the Cleveland Clinic with others, studied a group of 216 children whose mothers drank different amounts of alcohol during pregnancy. The levels of fatty acid ethyl ester (SEAG), which are produced when alcohol is processed in the digestive system, were measured in the first newborn chair. The babies were then given developmental tests at the ages of 6 months, one year and two years.
Newborns with higher levels of SEAG in their first chair were at greater risk of developing developmental disorders. Measuring the levels of SEAG in the newborn's first chair could be a useful method in identifying children at risk for SFB, which could make early intervention possible.
Alina Sica
Editor
March 10, 2008