Ware

Genital crisis in our newborn

Genital crisis in our newborn

Question:

- My little girl is new born and she is only 10 days old. Her breasts were swollen and very strong. I admitted her and she was given antibiotics, is it normal to be given antibiotics at that age? Specifically, when he saw her the doctor was very surprised at the sight of her swollen breasts. What is his diagnosis? Is this something serious? I mention that the wife does not breastfeed because she has no milk and we feed her with milk.

Answer:

In some cases, the passage of hormones from the maternal blood into the fetal circulation, can cause after birth, the appearance of transient changes in the newborn. These changes can occur in both boys and girls, being known as "genital crisis".

Thus the mammary glands grow in size and strengthen at 3-4 days after birth; sometimes they may even have a milky secretion similar to breast milk. These phenomena can last from several days to several months.

In girls, there may also be manifestations at the vulvo-vaginal level, manifested by bleeding or the appearance of a vulvo-vaginal secretion. In boys, an increase in the volume of the testicles may occur. These manifestations are usually benign, with only adequate local hygiene required to prevent over-infections.

In the case of your little girl, given that the hospitalization and administration of antibiotic treatment has been decided, it is possible that an overinfection of the mammary glands may have occurred in the middle of a genital crisis.

Antibiotics are given for the treatment of a bacterial infection, regardless of age; only, depending on the age and type of infection, different types of antibiotics are chosen.

I advise you to try to communicate with the attending physician and directly ask him / her for information and suggestions regarding the diagnosis (he is the only one who knows the exact diagnosis - we can only suspect based on those reported by you) and the treatment needed in the case of your little girl.

Tags Baby Health Issues Newborns